Music Sites

Under Development

Tablatures

Song-Xia Guan Tao 松下觀濤

Fingering according to the Yan Lu Lou Qinpu 研露楼指法

Guqin links

There are many web-sites of varying quality dealing with the guqin and its music. Those below are the ones I find most interesting or useful. Personal sites are listed in alphabetical order by surname, society sites in alphabetical order by location.

Sites in English

Personal Sites

Jim Binkley has two sites, including his translation of the sections of Yuguzhai Qinpu on qin construction

http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~jrb/chin/index.html

and

http://www.cspdx.edu/~jrb/chinurls.html

Judy CHANG Peiyou has a site at:

http://www.tcfb.com/guqin/

Stephen DYDO has information about both his qin playing and making

http://www.dydomusic.com/services.htm

Charlie HUANG contributed a suite of articles to Wikipedia. In the original suite Mr Huang occasionally allowed his love of the qin and his enthusiasm for making it more widely known to run ahead of his information but his work was still valuable as a general introduction to the guqin. Recently, however, Mr Huang has turned his attention elsewhere, and changes made others have reduced the value of his original work. The head article is at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guqin

Julian JOSEPH has information about, inter alia, his work on the Shiyi Xian Guan Qinpu at:

http://members.aol.com/jmgjoseph

LIU Li, a member of New York's Melody of Dragon ensemble, has a site at:

http://www.melodyofdragon.org/liuli.html

T. M. McCOMB has information too at:

http://www.medieval.org/music/world/china.html

By far the biggest guqin site in English, and perhaps the biggest in any language, belongs to John THOMPSON, whose efforts to recover, analyse and play previously forgotten tunes have been equalled, if at all, only by very few people in the People's Republic of China.

http://www.silkqin.com

WANG Fei has a site at:

http://www.feiwang.com/

Guqin Society Sites

The North American Guqin Association (NAGA) based in Hayward, California, has is site at

http://www.guqin.org

The London Youlan Qin Society can be found at:

http://www.ukchinesemusic.com/londonyoulanqin

and that of the New York Qin Society is at

http://www.newyorkqin.org

Other Sites

Other sites include:

http://www.chinapage.com/4arts.html (the guqin as one of the four arts of a Chinese scholar)

http://www.rootsworld.com/rw/feature/china1.html

There are or have been a number of discussion forums for the qin. They include one at the NAGA site:

http://lists.guqin.org/listinfo.cgi/qinexam-list-guqin.org

and another run by Charlie HUANG at:

http://starvoid.proboards30.com/index.cgi

Sites in Chinese

Mainland China

First there is CHENG Gongliang's site, formerly at:

http://cgl.vip.sina.com/guqin/index.htm

Then Chinese Guqin, a site set up by PEI Jinbao, a student of WU Zhaoji:

http://www.chineseguqin.com

(NB. In order to read the home page of this site you will need to set the encoding of your browser to Chinese GB18030.)


Hong Kong

Dr TSE Chun-Yan has a site at:

http://www.tsechunyan.com

Taiwan


Sites in Japanese

Japan

Youran publishes in Japanese:

http://www.fin.or.jp/~youran/

There is a site by Eastern Ocean at:

http://www.guqin.jp/toppage.htm

and one by Kokin at:

http://www.guqin.jp/kokin-news/kokin-news.htm

(The three sites above appear to be down or to have moved.)

There are photographs of qin being made by a Japanese craftsman, and apparently with the traditional antler paste and natural lacquer, at:

http://home7.highway.ne.jp/kaneko/index/sichigen.html


Other Chinese Music Sites

For the pipa there are

http://www.philmultic.com (in seven languages including Chinese and English)

and CHENG Yu's site at:

http://www.ukchinesemusic.com (which includes a section on the guqin)

One of China's best known modern composers is TAN Dun. His publishers have a site for him at:

http://www.schirmer.com./composers/tan_works.html

I have not yet found sites for ZHOU Long, QU Xiaosong or CHEN Yi, but no doubt they exist somewhere.

Chime, the European Foundation for Chinese Music Research, has a site at

http://solar.rtd.utk.edu/~china/china.html

The Chinese Arts and Music Association in Seattle has a site at

http://www.eskimo.com/~cama/index.html

Mauricio MARTINEZ R., who has studied sheng at the Shanghai Conservatory of music, Indian music in Delhi and traditional Japanese music in Tokyo, has a wide-ranging site in Spanish on Asian performing arts at:

http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Temple/5670/presentacion.html

http://www.sonarchy.org:80/archives/ndicm_index.html covers a wide range of Chinese music.

General China links

The Internet Guide for China Studies, a very comprehensive index of China links, covers every aspect of China and can be found at

http://www.sino.uni-heidelberg.de/igcs/

There is a link to this site from the Australian National University which gives it a five-star rating (the ANU site is itself classed as essential by the Far Eastern Economic Review).

There are sites with many links at China Links for HyperChina Users

http://www.sinologic.com/ChinaLinks.html

and the European Association of Sinology Librarians

http://www.uni-kiel.de:8080/ORIENTALISTIK/easl/art.html

Not Really (or Even) Traditional Chinese Music, But Favourite Sites

Finally here are some sites wome of which involve Chinese musicians working with people from other areas, and producing music I like. They all have downloadable or streamable samples of their work.

GONG Linna and Robert ZOLLITSCH as a duo, at the Wuxing Yuedui and with other groups do magnificent work:

Wu Xing Yuedui 五行乐队

as, in a completely different style, does Hsueh-li ONG at Electric Muse in Singapore

Electric Muse

Xenovibes

And then there is the Inner Mongolian singer Urna CHAHAR-TUGCHI

Urna

An English folk-rock band, Shinjig, not just because my brother plays in it, also because of their impressive array of MySpace friends, one or two of them several cuta above average in the beauty stakes:

Shinjig

And the Diablo Swing Orchestra:

Diablo Swing Orchestra

And what about Hoven Droven?

Hoven Droven

or Crosscut Saw?

Crosscut Saw

and Katus?

Katus

and Ara Hiroko

Ara Hiroko

or Eva Alkula, who also plays kantele but in a very different style:

Eva Alkula

and Emmi Knuutinen, in yet another style

Emmi Knuutinen

Then there's The Last Tram tae Auchenshuggle

The Last Tram tae Auchenshuggle

Then there's the amazing South American music played by an Taiwanese youth orchestra on Chinese instruments:

台北新潮樂集 Taipei Xinchao Yueji

The list is endless.

Latest revision: 14 May 2003